COVID-19 UPDATE: Arborwell is Open and Performing Essential Tree Care Services at this time

Arborwell is Open for Essential Tree Services

COVID-19 UPDATE: Arborwell is Open and Performing Essential Tree Care Services at this time

Arborwell is Open for Essential Tree Services

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Arbor-Blog

Tree Wellness

How Much Water Does My Tree Need?

This year our normal summer watering needs become even more critical since our trees have been at a water deficient most of the spring. So, the obvious question is – How much and how often should I water? This depends on the location, tree type and how mature it is – among other factors.

If the leaves are brown on the edges and are drooping or wilted, your tree isn’t getting enough water. Long term water stress usually leads to twig dieback, very little new growth and more susceptibility to insects and diseases.

drought, tree health, tree management, water conservation

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beneficial insects

Beneficial Insect Release

Another solution to pest management that has become more popular in recent years is the release of beneficial insects. These are essentially good guy insects that attack the eggs or larva of the harmful insects. In the natural, their population in a given area varies a lot depending on the sources of food they have.

Beneficial insects are a valuable asset to the ecosystem, besides preying on harmful pests, they are good pollinators too. An example of a beneficial insect is green lacewing. They have a wide array of insect targets including aphids, psyllids, and Tussock moth and other caterpillars. Beneficial insect releases can be incorporated into plant health care programs, especially as a multi-year plan to combat ongoing pest infestations. Incorporating beneficial insects to your landscape help restore a healthy and natural balance to the environment.

Beneficial Insects, ecofriendly landscape, green lacewing, pest management

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tree care services

Threats to your Redwoods

Specific Redwood Issues

Phytophthora Root Rot

Phytophthora root rot is caused by a soil-borne organism. When first infected, the coast redwood’s foliage may wilt, yellow and dry out but remain on the tree. The leaf damage is because of the slow death of the redwood’s roots, which limit its ability to absorb adequate amounts of water. Eventually, the entire tree will turn brown and is unlikely to recover. If caught early enough, phytophthora root rot’s presence in the soil may be managed, or at least reduced, with the application of a fungicide containing potassium phosphate. But this is not always successful.

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commercial tree service

Why is Soil pH Important?

One measurement we use in helping to determine overall soil health is soil pH. This is a common concept and important to understand, but is only one of many measurements we use to determine overall soil health. A good soil health recommendation will take many factors into consideration, but soil pH is the starting point, as it helps us determine nutrient availability, the tightness of soils, and the ability of soil biology to thrive or not. The wrong pH may encourage fungal pathogens, while the proper soil pH range will encourage good soil microbes.


The pH scale runs from 0 to 14. Any pH reading below 7 is acidic and any pH above 7 is alkaline. A pH of 7 indicates a neutral soil. Most trees will grow in soils having a pH between 6.5 (slightly acid) and 7.2 (slightly alkaline). Ideally, maintaining a soil close to 6.8 is perfect for most trees. There are a few plants that prefer a soil pH below 6.0. These “acid-loving” plants include azaleas, rhododendrons, and blueberries. The soil pH for these plants can be lowered by incorporating elemental sulfur (S) into the soil. Since the soil acidifying response to elemental sulfur is slow, it should be applied and incorporated a year before planting.

ph balance, plant health care, soil

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care for redwood trees

Challenges with Caring for Redwood Trees

Towering redwood trees make quite an impact and are beloved by residents and visitors alike. Robust and long-lived, these large trees suffer comparatively few issues, though they’re not problem-free. What are the challenges with caring for redwood trees on your San Diego, Sacramento, San Francisco, or Seattle property? Be on the lookout for these red flags.

challenges, redwood trees, redwoods, tree care, tree maintenance

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sudden oak death

What Causes Sudden Oak Death?

What causes Sudden Oak Death in trees and plant life? Sudden Oak Death, or SOD, is caused by the pathogenic fungus Phytophthora ramorum. This waterborne mold pathogen infiltrates plants and trees through contaminated irrigation water, wind-blown rain, infected plants, and contaminated pots and soil mixes. This fungus is also associated with other tree wellness issues like Ramorum leaf blight, Ramorum dieback, and Phytophthora canker.

disease, fungus, oak tree, tree health

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tree care

How Poor Drainage Can Create Root Rot in Trees

Roots are the foundation of your trees and essential to their health and longevity. However, buried out of sight, roots in poor condition often go unnoticed until it is too late. Diseases, soggy soil, and drought affect root health. When these inhospitable soil conditions exist, they can lead to many root diseases, collectively referred to as root rot. Poor drainage is a leading cause of these issues, and it often takes the expert eye of a skilled arborist to identify root-related tree problems. How does poor drainage create root rot in trees?

drainage, root care, root disease, tree health

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tree wellness

The Value of Trees in an Urban Environment

More than half of the world’s population now lives in urban towns and cities. Due to socio-economic factors, this number is only expected to increase. In most situations, the rapid expansion of cities takes place with little if any planning, leading to disastrous consequences for nearby forests and green areas, increasing pollution, and decreasing the availability of food and other natural resources.

With tree planning and management, trees can reduce these adverse effects, even with the amplification of these issues from climate change. In fact, the value of trees and green spaces in the urban environment is so great that many areas are beginning to look at ways to increase their tree count. Just what makes urban trees and plant life so valuable?

The Environmental Benefits of Trees

Trees absorb carbon, fighting climate change
Mature trees can absorb hundreds of pounds of CO2 annually. Trees sequester and store atmospheric CO2, using it during photosynthesis to produce sugars for energy, and releasing oxygen as a by-product.   

Trees filter pollutants from the air
Trees clean the air, absorbing dangerous contaminants like carbon monoxide, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and sulfur oxides and filter out fine particulates like smoke, dust, and dirt.

Trees cool the air, decreasing the “heat island” effect
Strategically placed trees can reduce the “heat island” effect, cooling the surrounding air between 4 – 15 degrees F. This helps people feel more comfortable, reducing AC use and energy consumption, and offering energy savings of up to 30%. They also insulate against wind, reducing heating bills by 20-50%.

Trees and greenery regulate water flow
Healthy trees and greenery can help control water flow, thwarting runoff, and preventing flooding. One mature evergreen can intercept more than 4,000 gallons of water annually.

Trees increase biodiversity
Planting and caring for native trees and plants increases urban biodiversity, offering a safe habitat for plants and animals.

The Socioeconomic Benefits of Trees

Trees provide a healthier environment
Trees improve air quality, producing oxygen and filtering pollutants and particulates from the air, helping reduce the incidence of disease and supporting the health of urban populations.

Trees can contribute to food security
The fruits and nuts from trees can provide food for humans and animals or composted and used to improve the quality of the soil.

Access to green spaces improves mental health
Multiple studies show proximity to green spaces is strongly associated with improved physical and mental health, decreasing high blood pressure and stress, and contributing to a more pleasant neighborhood environment. 

Trees can boost property value
Planning to include trees in the design of your San Diego, Sacramento, San Francisco Bay Area, or Seattle urban property can increase its value by up to 20%, attracting residents, tourists, and businesses.

Enhance the value of trees in your urban environment. Safeguard the health of your trees for future generations with proper care, or learn more about ways to increase your green space with the help of Arborwell Professional Tree Management. Contact us at 888-969-8733 today.

root care, tree health care, tree trimming, urban forest

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